Sunday, 26 February 2017

Happy Birthday 2000AD - 40 years old!

The vast majority of this article first appeared back in the distant days of early 2013 - ah we were so innocent and naive! Scottish independence was still a possibility, the idea of leaving the EU was a mad mans dream and talking about mad men, the notion of some thick as two short planks reality TV host becoming the US president was only in some post apocalyptic writers imagination. Good times.

I decided that in order to celebrate the 40th birthday of the worlds greatest ever comic I would like to join the throng (never wanting to be left out of anything) and do my little bit. It seemed fitting to re-publish my own little love letter to 2000AD as my little birthday celebration- besides which it also meant that it would save me a whole heap of work working on something new. The piece is pretty much as it was in its 2013 form, save my a few spelling & grammar corrections (what a surprise, I hear you say) and a tiny bit of reformatting.

So here you are 2000AD - Happy 40th Birthday!!!!'


The very first copy - It used up every penny I had!
I openly admit it - my obsession with Science fiction has few, if any boundaries. I don't regard myself as an sci-fi aficionado or snob……. and certainly not an expert. I love H.G Wells, Jules Verne, Star Trek, Star Wars, Solaris and Spaceballs all with equal abandon. I'm often asked what began my obsession with this genre (well actually, I'm never asked that question…… but let's just say for arguments sake that I am), my reply is rather simple. So once more we take a walk down one of the lanes of my memory, just take my hand and all will be made clear.

It began when I was 10 years old. 

One afternoon I was walking home from school with Ian, who happened to be my best mate at the time. The trip normally would take about 30 minutes to get home, it should have only been only 10, but you know how young boys are. About three quarters of the way home he started talking about a new comic that had come out just that week. "It's not like the usual ones we get, it's not like ANYTHING else" …. I distinctly remember the emphasis he put on the word 'anything'. 

Now, my dearest 5D blog reader, you need to be aware of the comic landscape back in the later 1970's. It was incredibly competitive - weekly sales were through the roof of many well established titles and the average shelf life of new comics was usually, at best, just a few short years. Many kids had their specific favourites and we were no different - I had yet to fully embrace the wonders of Marvel comics and so at the particular time we were obsessed with the war comic 'Battle'. Also being a bit of a football and cricket freak, i was also a huge fan of the sports comic Shoot!.  So, as for many comic buyers, it was going need something special to take me away those particular affections - I was very set in my ways you know.

Now this is where the makers of 2000AD were either very fortunate, or very clever. By 1977 the genre of Science fiction was moving away from the niche market that it had always inhabited to becoming mainstream - and we're talking big time mainstream of monstrous proportions! The success of a certain Star Wars movie, together with Close Encounters of the 3rd kind et al meant that a huge Science Fiction Tsunami seemed to be taking over popular culture at the time…..and I mean it was everywhere! You couldn't turn on a television without seeing a light sabre, droid or an alien of any type. The timing was perfect. 2000AD was a comic that tapped into this cultural explosion and not only that, it was edgy, it took chances, it was intense and in parts it was shocking at times. So much so that some of those early stories would would be problematic these days in terms of acceptability.

The artwork and story lines had an immediate sophistication that put it's competitors immediately in the shade. Indeed few, if any, of the competing titles at the time which were also trying to ride the science fiction Tsunami lasted very long and soon fell by the wayside. My friend Ian was quite right (as he usually was in most things), 2000AD wasn't like anything else. The very next day after school finished I used up the only pennies that I had and bought that very first copy.


The first copy, and the immediate ones that followed each week, were intensely seductive in their mixture of futuristic offerings which at times pulled no punches when it came to mixing in a little horror and gore. It was to this, and many other pre-adolescent boys, the punk rock of comics - it tested the boundaries of taste and daring and simply went places where the mainstream comics dared not tread. I distinctly remember my dad one day picking up one of the early editions and exclaiming that the blood and guts in one of the story lines was far too much for a boy of my age - I sulked for a week until he finally relented. For the next few years the characters and stories were my constant weekly companions - my already existing interest in science fiction now became an obsession.

The comic has now passed into its 35th year of production and going on nearly 2000 editions, a testament to its enduring and endearing quality. A quality that has been brought to us from what reads like a who's who of literary and graphic British talent, many of whom have crossed over into Graphic novel, literary novels, television, cinema and the wider American comic market. Peter Milligan (Tank Girl),  Grant Morrison (Batman: Arkham Asylum), Neil Gaiman (Sandman), Dave Gibbons, Mark Millar, Garth Ennis, Brian Talbot, Brian Bolland and Alan Moore have all become synonymous in many other areas. Indeed, many others that initially cut their teeth on 2000AD went on to succeed in America, with huge influences in the Marvel and DC universes. 

So here is a brief recollection of some of the characters and features from MY particular era of Britain's finest contribution to Science fiction.


Judge Dredd

The very first appearance of ole' Happy Joe 
Without doubt the single most iconic creation to come out of the comic, having crossed over into the wider social consciousness in everything from pop art to feature films . By the way, one of the movie adaptations is terrible, the other, much much better…….sit down Mr Stallone, you know which one I'm referring to as a waste of celluloid. 

Dredd didn't actually appear until the 2nd edition of 2000AD, though he has appeared in every single edition since then. His character was Inspired by the cop ' Dirty Harry' played by Clint Eastwood, a tough, unrelenting policeman who was more than prepared to kill the bad guy first than waste time going through the annoying bureaucracy of the justice system. Judge Dredd is entrusted with the ability not only to enforce the law, but also to instantly select the appropriate level of extreme justice on the spot – often this means execution. Initially set in 2099, he fights his crime in Mega-City One, a huge dystopian monstrosity of a city which stretches down the entirety of the U.S. eastern seaboard. 

I must admit here and now that this character was never my absolute favourite of the comic. I'm not sure why, possibly his character me me all too often fell into the realms of caricature. However, the huge sprawling epic storminess such as The Cursed earth and The Robot wars took the reader into story arcs of complex and thought provoking beauty.


Flesh


Flesh was an intriguing premise for a story, and one which I remember being hugely enjoyable for its quota of horror and gore levels of art. The plot essentially provided an entertaining explanation as to how the dinosaurs actually became extinct - there's no life destroying meteor here. Instead, in the future meat has run out. However, time-travel is now possible and so the prehistoric monsters find themselves being herded and farmed for their meat by cowboys from the future.

The first story-arc ran for the first 19 issues of the comic and also appeared in the 1977 annual, which I remember proudly receiving as a Christmas present that year. 

Of course, this being 2000AD, things didn't run smoothly for the time-travelling dinosaur meat farmers - with many of the cowboys being devoured in the most delicious of gory ways. 

Perhaps the most memorable of the characters from this story was one of the dinosaurs,  the half blind Tyrannosaurus Rex, Old One Eye. Basically, he's had enough of these pesky humans farming off his mates and starts fighting back, which essentially means eating them.  The humans main protector comes in the form of Earl Reagan, a Marshall who is charged to protect the humans and fight back the dinosaurs. Lovely Gory stuff.



Tharg's Future Shocks

“Out in the vast reaches of the universe, there are an infinite number of stories waiting to be told. From the lowliest denizens of backwater galaxies to rulers of entire star systems, anything is possible in these twisted tales. Abandon your preconceptions, expect the unexpected and take a trip beyond the edges of imagination…"

Tharg the Mighty, alien editor of 2000 AD 


The future shocks were couched firmly in the tradition of classic series such as The Twilight Zone and The Outer Limits - weekly singular self contained short stories taking two or three pages of the comic, often accompanied by a nifty little twist in the tail ending. The series of stories didn't actually begin until prog 25, starting with a story by Steve Moore and would prove to be an introduction for a plethora of new writers and artists such as artists and writers and creators such as Alan Davies and Grant Morrison.  

Similarly to Judge Dredd, the future shocks have taken a life of their own outside the confines of 2000AD, with a range of separate graphic novels and collections of the stories being published. Two collections of Alan Moore's Future Shocks (Alan Moore's Shocking Futures) and Time Twisters (Alan Moore's Twisted Times) have been recent and much welcomed additions to my own collection.

The Shocks are a fantastic assortment of darkly funny, sometimes unsettling and often demented twisted tales of sic-fi horror set in times and worlds where nothing is ever at it appears to be. Always one of the favourites parts for me of each prog.





Other notable inclusions of the early progs were ; 


Invasion, where Britain in 1999 are invaded by the nasty Volgans ( thinly veiled Russians) and a terrific tale of residence against the occupiers takes place

The Harlem Heroes - they play the futuristic sport of Aeroball which is now the most popular sport on the planet.

M.A.C.H 1 - John probe is a British secret agent who volunteered to undertake a ground breaking experiment which enhances his physical strength, speed and agility using the super duper secret procedure of 'compu-puncture'. Any similarity in looks and abilities to The Six Million Dollar Man are purely, er, coincidental.

Dan Dare - vaunted at the time as 200AD''s flagship character, the old comic strip hero from The Eagle is once again fighting the good fight against the dastardly Mekon.


On a slightly depressing note to finish….. 

When the comics first came out I did what most boys did. I bought them, read them and then threw them away. Thoughts of keeping them for posterity, looking after them and maybe even selling them never entered my mind at 10 and 11 years of age. However, when I was 16 I found out that an acquaintance at school had the first 200 copies, most of which I was assured were in good shape. They were mine if I wanted them……. for free. Of course I bloody well wanted them. 

This time I treated them with the respect that I now believed they deserved - they were read again and again of course (I'm not that disciplined), but they were also kept in individual plastic covers for protection and had pride of place on my bedroom shelf. I don't ever recall planning to keep the collection in order to eventually sell them as it simply never occurred to me that comics could ever become collectors items. They became a guilty pleasure. The bottom line was that even as I was at an age when I should be outgrowing comics (hence the derision I heard from my friends and parents at the time). Every few months I took them down from my shelf and gently unwrapped them from their protective covering to read each one from cover to cover. I was still transfixed by the incredible mix of science fiction and horror. Stupidly I was a little ashamed of my nerd-dom…….not any more!

I managed to keep them until I was nearly 20. I may have read them a little less as the years had progressed as newer forms of science fiction & horror (and the female gender) began to captivate me, but they were still there on my shelf and were indeed looked at on occasion. They were always, if nothing else, a welcome connection to my childhood obsessions. That was until one day when I decided to change their protective covers for new ones - all the comics has been placed (naked) on the floor beside my bed, ready for the 're-covering' the next day. That night, I went out on the town for a friend's birthday bash, got drunk, came home the worst for wear. I awoke the next morning to discover that I had thrown up during the night and destroyed virtually every copy……

When I checked back in 2010 about how much the first 3 editions alone were selling for to collectors, reasonable condition ones like mine were going for approximately £150 each. Well, Bugger.












This article can also be found via the 5D website www.5d-blog.com. There you can find a veritable feast of blog articles, news items, pictures and and other mouth-watering salutations to the gods of the geeks and the nerds. We have now inherited the earth, you know.

There is also a newly launched forum on the website designed for ANYONE involved or interested in the Independent film industry related to genres of Sci-Fi, fantasy and horror. Feel free to register and contribute - Everyone is welcome!




In addition the 5D website now has PayPal Donate button. Any donations kindly made will be fed directly back to help with a podcast materials, competition prizes and other general costs etc. If you wish to contribute to the exciting growth of the website & blog then we here at 5D headquarters would be eternally grateful. If you would like your contribution to be acknowledged publicly then simply send a message via the website’s contact section and we’ll send you some love!

If all that was enough to entice to 5D land, should any of you fine people out there wish to advertise on the 5D website then have a look at the offer below.


Sunday, 19 February 2017

The Love Witch (2016)

Written, Produced, and Directed by: Anna Biller

Starring: Samantha Robinson, Gian Keys, Laura Waddell, Jeffrey Vincent Parise, Jared Sanford, Robert Seeley, Jennifer Ingrum 

Cinematography: M. David Mullen, A.S.C.

Executive Producer: Jared Sanford

Production and Costume Design: Anna Biller


It cannot be denied that we live in interesting times to say the least. In some ways it feels that the lunatics are well and truly taking over the asylum both here in Europe (yes Brexiters, I'm looking at you), as well as over in the States (Just stand there in the corner Mr Trump and think about what you have done). There are days when I think we have taken a step back in time in regard to any number of things, racism, extremism (on all sides) and sexism. The last of which has had a particular resonance over recent months with a certain newly elected American president extolling the virtues of rampant misogamy aided by the support of a large number of individuals who seemed more than happy to accept and justify his apparent 'locker room' banter.  Well judging by the recent wonderful demonstrations across the world by women who refuse to step back in time, back into a world of acceptable stereotyping by men who are unable, or simply refuse to understand women, it seems happily that some things are not being silently accepted.

I know what you're thinking - 'Has 5D suddenly become a bastion of enlightened philosophical and social debate?' Well, er no. There's no need to worry because I remain the same self-indulgent, shallow narcissist with the attention span of a drunken gnat that I've always been. However, there are occasionally the odd moments of intellectual clarity (usually when the red wine runs out) that take place in my nerdy little middle-aged mind. 

Take a particular occurrence this week for example. There I was, holding my first hot coffee of the day while reading a morning paper (get me, multi-tasking) and seeing more of the aforementioned demonstrations by women taking place across the pond, when just at that moment I received a package through the post. The package was in fact a screener DVD from the lovely people at Fetch Publicity concerning a movie that deals with some of the very notions that I have been talking about..... male attitudes to women, feminism, narcissism, sex and gender - and all dressed up in a beautifully looking horror film that has a feel to is like no other I've seen in many a long year. 

I think it is safe to assume that The Love Witch grabbed my attention, basically because I fell a little bit in love with the concept, the story and the look of the film - and yes I admit it, more than a little smitten with the movie's lead actress. But more of that in a little while. Because before I throw your way some of my legendary (in my own mind at least) musings, let me send a little synopsis of The Love Witch in your general direction.


"Elaine, a beautiful young witch, is determined to find a man to love her. In her Gothic Victorian apartment she makes spells and potions, and then picks up men and seduces them. However her spells work too well, and she ends up with a string of hapless victims. When she finally meets the man of her dreams, her desperation to be loved will drive her to the brink of insanity and murder. With a visual style that pays tribute to Technicolour thrillers of the ‘60s, THE LOVE WITCH explores female fantasy and the repercussions of pathological narcissism."

To say that The Love Witch looks fantastic would be a something of a catastrophic understatement. It looks all at once sublime, sumptuous, divine and ever so deliciously devious - in fact I'm finding it hard to remember when a contemporary piece of film making left me agog. It is clear to see here the cinematic inspirations of cinematographer, M. David Mullen and writer/producer/director Anna Biller; if you were to select a portion of Hitchcock, add a few teaspoons of Hammer horror & garnish with a healthy sprinkle of Roger Corman then that would give you some idea about the visual stylistics on show. Indeed the very first scene of Elaine driving along the California highway would not have been entirely out of place in any number of Hitchcock films such as Marnie, Vertigo or Psycho.

However this is no criticism, not at all. The Love Witch is no superficial parody, not one bit. The lighting, make up and photography is a genuine feast for the eyes that serves to up a feast of texture and colour that at times is simply mesmerising. Directors like Roger Corman, a well as the directors of many of the Hammer horror films, knew of the power that light and colour can have on affecting and manipulating the audience and so becoming something of a plot device all of it's own. 

Through some confident direction, Anna Biller at times cunningly accentuates and at others merely hints to the audience through clever uses of colour as to what the emotional impact should be. For instance, the women-only tea room scene bathed in hues of peach and pink is inspired in the very different psychological impact it may have between male and female viewers. Psychologists have known for years the power that colour has upon human perception and emotion - and so have good filmmakers.

However don't be fooled, because this isn't a case of parodying appearance and style and thus concealing a lack of any real substance in the film's narrative. Yes there is an immensely strong visual style on show here, but there is also a powerful narrative at the heart of this excellent horror film. Biller is quite obviously setting out to challenge the audiences notion of what it means to be empowered, both for women and men in what it takes to survive psychologically, socially and emotionally. Throughout the film I found myself constantly uncomfortable, one moment feeling completely smitten with the very lovely Samantha Robinson and her quest for true love, the next moment feeling a sense of responsibility and shame at the madness that her character has been driven to by that very same superficial adoration shown by the men in her life. 

There are people far more enlightened than me in the nuances of patriarchal and matriarchal effects on personal empowerment that can often result in an empty psychological narcissism. All I will say that if the intention was to make men uncomfortable in the thought that we all to a certain extent treat women as nothing more than a 'Witch' whenever we simply may not understand them, then I like that intention. I like it a lot. There are some men that may regard this film as 'anti-men' - no, that it certainly is is not

The performances throughout The Love Witch are uniformly excellent, especially those of Samantha Robinson as the beautiful, but psychologically scarred monster whose emotional destruction has means that creating magical spells is the only way that she feels she can find true love. Robinson should be commended in transforming a character, one that could have easily been a one-dimensional cliched femme fatale, into a sympathetic women who would rather murder the man who loves her than have him live and not love her. 

Excellent too is Laura Waddell as the Realtor Trish, a character who is initially perplexed by Elaine's view that only by unconditionally pleasing and satisfying a man can a woman achieve any sense of empowerment. The scene where a Trish decides to try on some of Elaine's clothes and finds herself feeling the very sexual empowerment that she herself was mocking is fantastic.

The Love Witch is certainly unlike any horror film that I've seen in some time. It's beautiful to look at, wonderfully acted and filled not just with some fascinating reflections on gender empowerment, but just as importantly is a thoroughly enjoyable slice of serial killer horror movie making. It is sexy, funny, terrifying and may well inspire you to think a little. And that's a good thing.


The Love Witch is released in UK cinemas, VOD and digital HD on March 10th 2017.




You can find Anna Biller's website RIGHT HERE 







This article can also be found via the 5D website www.5d-blog.com. There you can find a veritable feast of blog articles, news items, pictures and and other mouth-watering salutations to the gods of the geeks and the nerds. We have now inherited the earth, you know.

There is also a newly launched forum on the website designed for ANYONE involved or interested in the Independent film industry related to genres of Sci-Fi, fantasy and horror. Feel free to register and contribute - Everyone is welcome!





In addition the 5D website now has PayPal Donate button. Any donations kindly made will be fed directly back to help with a podcast materials, competition prizes and other general costs etc. If you wish to contribute to the exciting growth of the website & blog then we here at 5D headquarters would be eternally grateful. If you would like your contribution to be acknowledged publicly then simply send a message via the website’s contact section and we’ll send you some love!

If all that was enough to entice to 5D land, should any of you fine people out there wish to advertise on the 5D website then have a look at the offer below.



Sunday, 12 February 2017

Star Trek Graphic Novel Series - A review of The City On The Edge Of Forever.

For the very first time ever, half a century of Star Trek comics have been collected together in a single delicious series. This is thanks in no small part to the lovely people at EaglemossI don't know about you, but a collection that spans 50 years and includes many of the seminal moments in Star Trek lore is mouth-watering to say the very least. Do we really want or need the chance to revisit all the classic characters and incredible art from the STAR TREK comic archives? The chance to experience every edition with a specially-commissioned introduction to provide context to the story? The chance to see a number of collected comics and a bonus reprint of one of the comic archive’s classic stories?

Oh, you betcha!

The world of science fiction, fantasy and horror is littered with countless 'what ifs?'; What if Guillermo Del Toro had actually stayed on board to make The Hobbit? Would it still have been an over-inflated self-indulgent CGI fest that lost the soul of the original text? What if the original writers of Judge Dredd had actually been consulted before the disaster that was the first cinematic incarnation featuring Sylvester Stallone (Stallone!!??) as the Mega City Fascist? What if the Alien series hadn't disappeared up its own xenomorphic posterior in haze of pseudo philosophic nonsense? (Yes, Prometheus, I'm talking about you.)

There are more examples, many more and if truth be told which could fill any number of future 5D articles. It may seem a little strange to suggest that a Star Trek episode, one that is rightly regarded as a bone fide all-time classic story and frequent headliner of Trek 'best of' lists, should be part of the 'What if....?' list. However, I would argue that The City on the edge of Forever for a number of reasons does deserve to be part of the list.

The City on the edge of Forever featured towards the end of the first TV series in 1967 and became an instant success with fans and quite rightly gained a level of adoration that endures to this day. The episode sees Dr. McCoy accidentally inject himself with an hallucagenic stimulant which results in him escaping to a nearby planet and travelling through a time portal. This immediately causes havoc with the time line in which the our brave crew's ship, and more importantly the Federation, no longer exists. It's safe to say that things are pretty bad. In order to try and save the day Kirk and Spock follow McCoy back to 1930's America to do that thing they do and repair the time line.

The story was based upon the work of the much revered Sci-fi author Harlan Ellison but it was to experience a number of significant re-writes at the hands of other writers before it was deemed to fit into the acceptable Star Trek world. If the very public (and occasional legal) arguments are anything to go by, I think it's safe to assume that Mr Ellison didn't take the changes to his work very well. So much so that he never wrote for the series again.

Now don't get me wrong, I am a fully paid up member of the Star Trek obsessive club, the whole thing has been part of my life ever since I can remember and I confidently expect that despite the odd series blunder (Yes I'm looking at you Enterprise) my love will continue to endure for the rest of my days. However, I must admit that I have never quite fully felt comfortable with the cosy concept of future humanity envisioned by Gene Roddenberry in which we had lost the vast majority of our selfish, materialistic and warring nature. It all seemed a little naive and dare I say it, boring which meant that all too often there was a danger of some episodes foundering in a sea of nobleness in which harder edged story lines had little chance of flourishing. I'm sure that many will disagree with me...... I await the messages with, ahem, interest.

As a consequence, there are many like me who have often wondered what the result would have been if treatments like Ellison's far darker and complex teleplay for The City on the edge of Forever had ever found their way onto our TV screens. Well thanks to the work of some wonderful individuals we can now have something of a taste.
Some 50 years after the show aired IDW comics made the decision to produce Ellison's vision in the form of a comic book. The result of the work by writers Scott and David Tipton, together with the sumptuous artwork of J.K. Woodward is quite simply an astonishing interpretation of Harlan's work.

For a start there are some glaringly obvious reasons as to why the original story draft was tinkered with so much because there is an explicit harder edge to the narrative than any episode ever dared have. It is quite clear that having a violent crew member who spends part of his time on board dealing in illicit drugs doesn't exactly fit in with Mr Roddenberry's vision of a better future humanity - or with 1960's studio executives for that matter. In actuality, it is this renegade crew member who escapes through the time portal, not an accidentally stoned off his tits McCoy, thus contaminating the time line. 

As a matter of fact, fan favourite McCoy barely features in the story at all appearing in just the single scene. As it happens, it is the criminally underused (in the TV series) Yeoman Rand who is transformed from the role of Captains eye candy to that of a federation version of Xena-Warrior Princess as she shows her worth as a fully respected member of the crew. 

For all the 'advancements' in human society that the show envisaged in the future, gender equality was certainly one factor that had barely improved if the sixties version of the show was anything to go by. So it's rather nice to see a female character have a more nuanced place amongst the crew.

Another noticeable departure from the series is the more fractious relationship here between Spock and Kirk. If anything Spock here appears far more prone to grappling with the human side of his behaviour, particularly in the scene where he and Kirk argue over the positive merits of humanity after being attacked by anti-immigration mobs.

There is also a more complex interpretation of Kirks psychological state here as he struggles to cope with the responsibility of command as well as the terrible conundrum he faces with the decisions he will have to make.

The story here has a far more complex and darker tone than any TV episode whilst still remaining fairly true to the heart of Star Trek, something that won't please all fans - and that's OK. The story is beautifully written and so on a personal level for me the result is a far more satisfying story of genuine human emotion and behaviour that rarely was ever fully exposed on the screen.

As I mentioned earlier, the graphic novel looks truly beautiful and perfectly compliments the compulsive narrative - something I know for a fact that Harlan Ellison completely agrees with.









This article can also be found via the 5D website www.5d-blog.com. There you can find a veritable feast of blog articles, news items, pictures and and other mouth-watering salutations to the gods of the geeks and the nerds. We have now inherited the earth, you know.

There is also a newly launched forum on the website designed for ANYONE involved or interested in the Independent film industry related to genres of Sci-Fi, fantasy and horror. Feel free to register and contribute - Everyone is welcome!

In addition the 5D website now has PayPal Donate button. Any donations kindly made will be fed directly back to help with a podcast materials, competition prizes and other general costs etc. If you wish to contribute to the exciting growth of the website & blog then we here at 5D headquarters would be eternally grateful. If you would like your contribution to be acknowledged publicly then simply send a message via the website’s contact section and we’ll send you some love!

If all that was enough to entice to 5D land, should any of you fine people out there wish to advertise on the 5D website then have a look at the offer below.










Saturday, 4 February 2017

5D Competition - Win a personalised video greeting from actress Tracey Birdsall.

In the last few months it has been my pleasure to have got to know (just a teensy teensy little bit) the actress, Tracey Birdsall. Ever since news of the award winning film Rogue Warrior: Robot Fighter came the way of 5D HQ Tracey has been in the radar of yours truly. I can only apologise just how creepy that sounds - I know I have previous. Though in my defence the court restrictions and restraining orders have now thankfully gone away in regard to those other matters. I mean, just who knew that 278 emails a day to Helena Bonham Carter could be misconstrued as stalking? Well I bloody well know now, that's for sure... your honour.

Anyhoo, for a flavour of the Tracey's talent, friendliness and downright drop dead gorgeousness you could do worse than check out the previous two articles that appeared on this blog;

The Interview with Tracey can be found RIGHT HERE

The review of the marvellous Rogue Warrior: Robot Fighter can be found RIGHT HERE

So you can imagine my delight when Tracey consented to offering herself up as a 5D competition prize (behave). However before I give you the details of the competition just have a look at a refresher of he career so far...........


"Tracey Birdsall is an award-winning American film and television actress recognised worldwide for her diverse and challenging roles - which recently earned her the esteemed Female Action Performer of the Year Award at the highly regarded Action on Film Festival for her role of Sienna in the recently Premiered and highly anticipated Science Fiction film Rogue Warrior: Robot Fighter(2016).


Birdsall has four feature films which will be released in 2016 alone: The lead of Sienna in the up-coming science fiction film Rogue Warrior: Robot Fighter (2016) opposite William KircherDaz Crawford, and Stephen Manley, the lead of Jenna in the up-coming comedy feature Who's Jenna...? (2016) opposite Bill SorvinoGarry Pastore, and Joseph D'Onofrio, playing herself in the up-coming Australian comedy Diary of a Fatman (2016), and the role of Dijanne in the up-coming science fiction film At the Edge of Time(2016). 

Tracey was also just cast as the female lead in Dance of the Blue Tattoo opposite Harry Lennix (The Blacklist (2013), filming soon in Gran Canaria. Birdsall can be seen opposite Barry Corbin once again in 2017 in The Time War (2017), a time travel film featuring a narration by Christopher Lee.

She was the female lead the feature film I Might Even Love You (1998) opposite Leigh McCloskey and James Van Patten which had a Cannes Festival debut, and also performed in films including but not limited to The Prophet's Game (2000) (starring Dennis Hopper), Casino (1992) (starring her good friend Sammy Jackson), Dawn of the Crescent Moon (2014) (opposite Barry Corbin), and Going Very Badly (2014) (opposite Gerry Bednob). She recently voiced the Spaceship Computer on Doomsday (2015) and the Deliverance Computer in Starship: Apocalypse (2014).

In 2014, Birdsall was named honorary Maverick Award Winner at the esteemed Action on Film Festival, and in 2015 the honorary Trailblazer Award at the Temecula Independent Film Festival for her contributions to the entertainment industry."




COMPETITION

Tracey Birdsall has kindly agreed to offer herself up as a competition prize for 5D. However before you people out there get the wrong end of the stick with the majority  of the male population crashing the 5D website with requests, let me explain. 

The prize for the lucky selected entrant is a personalised video greeting from the lady herself. The names of all the entrants who correctly answer Tracey's question will be put into a hat (yes, it's really a hat) and the winner will be selected at random and then sent to Tracey to do her thing. The lady is incredibly busy at the moment but she will squeeze into her busy schedule the recording of the message and then forward it on to the lucky winner.

The closing date for entries is February 19th 2017.

The Question from Tracey is: In our upcoming sci-fi feature Rogue Warrior: Robot Fighter  (to be released by Sony), my character Sienna deals with the overtaking of the worlds by artificial intelligence. Given that everything these days is leaning towards artificial intelligence, to what degree are you concerned about this issue in the future? And why?


Please go to the 5D Competition section at www.5d-blog.com to submit your answer. REMEMBER, you must include your email address when you submit your entry.


Good luck!






Tracey's official Facebook page can be found RIGHT HERE

Her IMDB page is RIGHT HERE

You can Tweet Tracey via her Twitter handle @traceybirdsall1












This article can also be found via the 5D website www.5d-blog.com. There you can find a veritable feast of blog articles, news items, pictures and and other mouth-watering salutations to the gods of the geeks and the nerds. We have now inherited the earth, you know.

There is also a newly launched forum on the website designed for ANYONE involved or interested in the Independent film industry related to genres of Sci-Fi, fantasy and horror. Feel free to register and contribute - Everyone is welcome!

In addition the 5D website now has PayPal Donate button. Any donations kindly made will be fed directly back to help with a podcast materials, competition prizes and other general costs etc. If you wish to contribute to the exciting growth of the website & blog then we here at 5D headquarters would be eternally grateful. If you would like your contribution to be acknowledged publicly then simply send a message via the website’s contact section and we’ll send you some love!

If all that was enough to entice to 5D land, should any of you fine people out there wish to advertise on the 5D website then have a look at the offer below.